Koalas in the Clarence Valley

Calling all citizen scientists and wildlife enthusiasts! Clarence Valley Council is keen to learn about where you've seen koalas.

We are collecting data on where our koalas are located to help conserve this iconic species. The koala register will let you pin point a koala sighting location on a map. You'll also be able to add more information about the sighting.

Furthermore, local koala release sites are lacking and so we are seeking nominations for suitable sites. If you think your property would make a suitable koala release site - nominate it! Head to the Release Site Nomination tab to fill in the form.

Calling all citizen scientists and wildlife enthusiasts! Clarence Valley Council is keen to learn about where you've seen koalas.

We are collecting data on where our koalas are located to help conserve this iconic species. The koala register will let you pin point a koala sighting location on a map. You'll also be able to add more information about the sighting.

Furthermore, local koala release sites are lacking and so we are seeking nominations for suitable sites. If you think your property would make a suitable koala release site - nominate it! Head to the Release Site Nomination tab to fill in the form.

  • Koala Food Trees in the Clarence

    about 1 month ago
    Kftidguide
    Clarence Valley Council hosted three Koala Food tree Identification Training sessions in November, with support from the NSW Government Saving our Species project. The workshops were presented by Clarence Valley Council NRM Project Officer, Caragh Heenan, and local botanist, Jeff Thomas.

    The half day workshops included a summary of current koala distribution and habitat in the Clarence Valley, information on eucalypts that are food trees for koalas and some in depth training on botanical terms to assist with eucalypt identification. Attendees received the brand new Koala Food Trees in the Clarence Eucalypt Identification Guide and plenty of resources to assist...

    Clarence Valley Council hosted three Koala Food tree Identification Training sessions in November, with support from the NSW Government Saving our Species project. The workshops were presented by Clarence Valley Council NRM Project Officer, Caragh Heenan, and local botanist, Jeff Thomas.

    The half day workshops included a summary of current koala distribution and habitat in the Clarence Valley, information on eucalypts that are food trees for koalas and some in depth training on botanical terms to assist with eucalypt identification. Attendees received the brand new Koala Food Trees in the Clarence Eucalypt Identification Guide and plenty of resources to assist them on their botanical journey.
    The public sessions were attended by 28 keen and enthusiastic members of the public and an additional session for 19 CVC staff from the planning and developing team was also a success.

    Thank you to everyone that came along and especially to Jeff Thomas for being such a knowledgeable resource to draw upon.

    The Koala Food Trees in the Clarence flip book is now available. Contact Caragh Heenan (Project Officer NRM) from the Clarence Valley Council Natural Resource Management team via email to receive your copy. Include your postal address if you wish for it to be mailed to you. Alternatively, you can download an electronic copy.


    This project has been assisted by the New South Wales Government through its Environmental Trust and Saving Our Species.

    Eucalypt descriptions in the guide were replicated with permission from the Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust (Sydney NSW) via PlantNET at http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/, 2019

    Eucalypt images in the guide were replicated with permission from the Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research (Director of National Parks and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Canberra ACT) via EUCLID at http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org:8080/euclid/data/02050e02-0108-490e-8900-0e0601070d00/media/Html/index.htm, 2019

    Eucalypt and koala distribution in the guide were mapped with data from the Atlas of Living Australia website at http://www.ala.org.au, 2019
  • The devil is in the detail

    3 months ago
    Gpsmapcamera

    Where an animal was sighted and the time that it was observed are the most important pieces of information for us when it comes to your data and using it to direct management decisions within council and state government. When it comes to data, the devil is in the detail and we need your help! One way around the problem is to use an App on your phone when taking photos.

    IPhone: Context Camera is available on the Apple iStore and can be used to record the latitude/longitude as decimal values inset on a photo, as well as a date/time...

    Where an animal was sighted and the time that it was observed are the most important pieces of information for us when it comes to your data and using it to direct management decisions within council and state government. When it comes to data, the devil is in the detail and we need your help! One way around the problem is to use an App on your phone when taking photos.

    IPhone: Context Camera is available on the Apple iStore and can be used to record the latitude/longitude as decimal values inset on a photo, as well as a date/time stamp - two very handy bits of information!

    Android: GPS Map Camera is available on the Google Play Store and can be used to record the latitude/longitude as decimal values inset on a photo, as well as a time stamp - two very handy bits of information! Once opening the App, click on the second icon from the top left, scroll to half way down the list and select Map + Lat/Long. This will provide us with a visual and numerical representation of location as well as a date/time stamp!

    For example, the photo below was taken today, the 25th of September 2019, at 1:30PM of a few trees in the park across from the Council Rushforth Rd depot at 121 Tyson St, Sth Grafton (-29.716, 152.927). This image was taken with Address and Lat/Long, but the Map + Lat/Long is even better!



  • Wildlife and domestic dog interactions - have your say!

    3 months ago
    Adobestock 196376672 comp


    Pets provide companionship and are a wonderful part of our lives. The wildlife are also an integral part of the environment and worthy of protection. Clarence Valley Council is seeking feedback from domestic dog owners regarding the interaction between their dogs and wildlife via an online survey - https://www.clarenceconversations.com.au/dogsandwildlife. Survey responses remain anonymous and we value your opinion, so please take the time to complete the survey and let us know what you think. With your help, we can ensure that our domestic dogs and our wildlife are both cared for.


    Pets provide companionship and are a wonderful part of our lives. The wildlife are also an integral part of the environment and worthy of protection. Clarence Valley Council is seeking feedback from domestic dog owners regarding the interaction between their dogs and wildlife via an online survey - https://www.clarenceconversations.com.au/dogsandwildlife. Survey responses remain anonymous and we value your opinion, so please take the time to complete the survey and let us know what you think. With your help, we can ensure that our domestic dogs and our wildlife are both cared for.

  • Koala Register Update

    about 1 year ago
    29 nov 2018 %284%29   comp


    The sightings for the Koala Register have been coming in, and so have the nominations of release sites - thanks to all that have been getting involved! To show you some of the interesting registered sightings, we have put together this infographic - Download



    The sightings for the Koala Register have been coming in, and so have the nominations of release sites - thanks to all that have been getting involved! To show you some of the interesting registered sightings, we have put together this infographic - Download


  • The Koalas in the Clarence Register goes live!

    about 1 year ago
    Thumbnail

    Clarence Valley Council have been working with the Office and Environment and Heritage through a NSW Environment Trust grant to deliver improved outcomes for the vulnerable koala population in the Clarence.

    The funded work will include on-ground activities to address threats to koalas, including loss of food and habitat, fire, pest animals and barriers. Education material will be developed and disseminated to identified landowners in koala habitat to help protect the last remaining individuals.

    As part of the program, we have launched the Koala Register! The register will enable us to gather data on where koalas are in the landscape...

    Clarence Valley Council have been working with the Office and Environment and Heritage through a NSW Environment Trust grant to deliver improved outcomes for the vulnerable koala population in the Clarence.

    The funded work will include on-ground activities to address threats to koalas, including loss of food and habitat, fire, pest animals and barriers. Education material will be developed and disseminated to identified landowners in koala habitat to help protect the last remaining individuals.

    As part of the program, we have launched the Koala Register! The register will enable us to gather data on where koalas are in the landscape to further learn about why they prefer a particular habitat, why certain habitats contain more species than other similar habitats, and why they are declining from particular areas. By understanding their distribution, we can determine the conservation value of regional zones and further develop management guidelines for natural resources.

    Get involved and register a sighting!

    Happy sharing and thanks for being involved!